7 deadly sins of psychology

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7 deadly sins of psychology

The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology: A Manifesto for Reforming the Culture of Scientific Practice by Chris Chambers

Why psychology is in peril as a scientific discipline--and how to save it

Psychological science has made extraordinary discoveries about the human mind, but can we trust everything its practitioners are telling us? In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that a lot of research in psychology is based on weak evidence, questionable practices, and sometimes even fraud. The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology diagnoses the ills besetting the discipline today and proposes sensible, practical solutions to ensure that it remains a legitimate and reliable science in the years ahead.

In this unflinchingly candid manifesto, Chris Chambers draws on his own experiences as a working scientist to reveal a dark side to psychology that few of us ever see. Using the seven deadly sins as a metaphor, he shows how practitioners are vulnerable to powerful biases that undercut the scientific method, how they routinely torture data until it produces outcomes that can be published in prestigious journals, and how studies are much less reliable than advertised. He reveals how a culture of secrecy denies the public and other researchers access to the results of psychology experiments, how fraudulent academics can operate with impunity, and how an obsession with bean counting creates perverse incentives for academics. Left unchecked, these problems threaten the very future of psychology as a science--but help is here.

Outlining a core set of best practices that can be applied across the sciences, Chambers demonstrates how all these sins can be corrected by embracing open science, an emerging philosophy that seeks to make research and its outcomes as transparent as possible.
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LUST - SEVEN DEADLY SINS !! EPISODE 1, HISTORY CHANNEL DOCUMENTARY

The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology

The review was inspired by the recent Dutch translation De 7 Doodzonden van de Psychologie see references below. Kahneman may be impressed with this type of work, but my experience is that, upon being confronted with priming research, most audiences start to laugh. The results are not made up, nor are they statistical flukes. Back in the day, critique on the scientific status quo was not appreciated: when a full professor at the University of Amsterdam once suggested that certain subdisciplines of psychology were better off being bulldozed, he ended up having to apologize profusely to his deeply offended colleagues. Rarely in the history of science did pride come before a fall so sudden and so deep. Diederik Stapel turned out to have fabricated data on an industrial scale, and —to the best of my knowledge— from the entire priming chapter in Thinking, Fast and Slow not a single experiment has been replicated successfully: disbelief turned out to be a viable option after all. The current psychological literature features the bulldozer, together with the bazooka and the bomber, as part of an accepted series of measures to cleanse the scientific record and repair the damaged trust.

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Luna C. Centifanti on the problems surrounding research practices in psychology and how they can be corrected. Given the recent spotlight on cases of non-replicability in social psychology although the problems are not confined to social psychology , would it be so surprising if we were no longer seen as scientists? Chambers argues that cases of non-replicability, bias and data dishonesty result from flaws in the way we tally our outputs and hoard our data and publications. Paywalls make research inaccessible to those who seek to use it — including teachers, policymakers and science journalists — and leave scientists in an echo chamber. In our search for novel results, we interrogate data like a lawyer when they are non-significant, even as we shelter significant data. We want data to be our best friend and confirm what we want to hear.

Psychological science has made extraordinary discoveries about the human mind, but can we trust everything its practitioners are telling us? In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that a lot of research in psychology is based on weak evidence, questionable practices, and sometimes even fraud. The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology diagnoses the ills besetting the discipline today and proposes sensible, practical solutions to ensure that it remains a legitimate and reliable science in the years ahead. In this unflinchingly candid manifesto, Chris Chambers draws on his own experiences as a working scientist to reveal a dark side to psychology that few of us ever see. Using the seven deadly sins as a metaphor, he shows how practitioners are vulnerable to powerful biases that undercut the scientific method, how they routinely torture data until it produces outcomes that can be published in prestigious journals, and how studies are much less reliable than advertised. He reveals how a culture of secrecy denies the public and other researchers access to the results of psychology experiments, how fraudulent academics can operate with impunity, and how an obsession with bean counting creates perverse incentives for academics.

4 thoughts on “The Seven Deadly Sins of Psychology: A Manifesto for Reforming the Culture of Scientific Practice by Chris Chambers

  1. Why psychology is in peril as a scientific discipline—and how to save it Psychological science has made extraordinary discoveries about the human mind, but can we trust everything its practitioners are telling us?

  2. Why psychology is in peril as a scientific discipline—and how to save it. Psychological science has made extraordinary discoveries about the human mind, but.

  3. Can we at all, or to what degree, be certain about the conclusions reached in psychological research?

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