Choice words peter johnston chapter summary

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choice words peter johnston chapter summary

Choice Words: How Our Language Affects Childrens Learning by Peter H. Johnston

In productive classrooms, teachers dont just teach children skills: they build emotionally and relationally healthy learning communities. Teachers create intellectual environments that produce not only technically competent students, but also caring, secure, actively literate human beings.

Choice Words shows how teachers accomplish this using their most powerful teaching tool: language. Throughout, Peter Johnston provides examples of apparently ordinary words, phrases, and uses of language that are pivotal in the orchestration of the classroom. Grounded in a study by accomplished literacy teachers, the book demonstrates how the things we say (and dont say) have surprising consequences for what children learn and for who they become as literate people. Through language, children learn how to become strategic thinkers, not merely learning the literacy strategies. In addition, Johnston examines the complex learning that teachers produce in classrooms that is hard to name and thus is not recognized by tests, by policy-makers, by the general public, and often by teachers themselves, yet is vitally important.

This book will be enlightening for any teacher who wishes to be more conscious of the many ways their language helps children acquire literacy skills and view the world, their peers, and themselves in new ways.
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Book Review - "Opening Minds" by Peter H. Johnston

Choice Words- Chapters 7 & 8

Johnston, I call this feeling a sense of agency. They show children how, by acting strategically, they accomplish things, and at the same time, that they are the kind of person who accomplishes things. This is why agency is also tightly bound to a growth mindset Carol Dweck. We form our identity through stories about ourselves where we see ourselves as the active protagonist with the ability to effect change. Our task as educators is to help them to build an awareness of their own identity as independent thinkers. Not to tell them how to think but help reveal their thinking, by reflecting back to them what we are observing, to notice and name their acts of problem solving.

This reminded me of a cooperative learning program we use at our school, Kagan. We had a couple professional developments that helped us practice different Kagan structures so that we could use them properly and effectively in our own classrooms. Many of what Johnston mentions in his last chapters reminded me of Kagan strategies I already incorporate in my classroom. Kagan is all about working together to learn and transfer information. This helps students realize that we all are in the learning process together. Kagan is also good at implementing compliments after someone has shared. Students get to praise one another which helps boost confidence and self esteem.

Thinking back to jr high school, I remember reading a short story in my English class called Chains of Change. It is in first person point of view and the character goes through relatable issues such as dating, self esteem, working out a problem as well as developmental stages like personal fable and imaginary stage. I remember being able to relate to the character and thinking that maybe someone else felt the same way I did.
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Continue to book preview. Registration to Stenhouse is optional, just click above to continue to the online book preview without registering. In productive classrooms, teachers don't just teach children skills: they build emotionally and relationally healthy learning communities. Teachers create intellectual environments that produce not only technically competent students, but also caring, secure, actively literate human beings. Choice Words shows how teachers accomplish this using their most powerful teaching tool: language. Throughout, Peter Johnston provides examples of apparently ordinary words, phrases, and us Throughout, Peter Johnston provides examples of apparently ordinary words, phrases, and uses of language that are pivotal in the orchestration of the classroom.

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