The sense and nonsense of vitamins

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the sense and nonsense of vitamins

Do You Believe in Magic?: The Sense and Nonsense of Alternative Medicine by Paul A. Offit

In Do You Believe in Magic?, medical expert Paul A. Offit, M.D., offers a scathing exposé of the alternative medicine industry, revealing how even though some popular therapies are remarkably helpful due to the placebo response, many of them are ineffective, expensive, and even deadly.

Dr. Offit reveals how alternative medicine—an unregulated industry under no legal obligation to prove its claims or admit its risks—can actually be harmful to our health.

Using dramatic real-life stories, Offit separates the sense from the nonsense, showing why any therapy—alternative or traditional—should be scrutinized. He also shows how some nontraditional methods can do a great deal of good, in some cases exceeding therapies offered by conventional practitioners.

An outspoken advocate for science-based health advocacy who is not afraid to take on media celebrities who promote alternative practices, Dr. Offit advises, “There’s no such thing as alternative medicine. There’s only medicine that works and medicine that doesn’t.”
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Vitamania: What is a Vitamin?

Movie Review – Vitamania: The Sense and Nonsense of Vitamins

Exhibitor Workshops XR Demos. Media Lab Fellows. Become a Partner. Synopsis: One billion of us take a vitamin or supplement regularly — or give one to our children. Some doctors point to research that shows they can be lifesavers. Many others claim that most vitamin products are useless, and some are downright dangerous. All of this provokes confusion.

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Dr Derek Muller takes us on an epic adventure, a world-spanning investigation of vitamin science and history, asking how do we decide whether to take vitamin supplements, or not? Almost one billion of us take one regularly — or give one to our children. Every week, a new benefit is claimed. Some doctors point to research that shows they can be lifesavers. Many others claim that most vitamin products are useless, and some are downright dangerous.

Add items from around the store. Happy shopping! A documentary about vitamins: the history of their discovery, the dietary supplement industry, and the dangers of both deficiencies and excessive intake. Almost one billion of us take a regular dietary supplement, mainly vitamin tablets. Vitamins are enthusiastically endorsed by celebrities, and vitamin-fortified foods line our supermarket shelves.

This website uses cookies for user login, personalised content and statistics. By continuing to browse the site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies - if you wish to opt-out of non-essential cookies, you may do so below. But where is the evidence that any given potion or pill delivers the promises plastered on the bottle? Hosted by Derek Muller — who also fronts the extremely successful YouTube science channel Veritasium — Vitamania traverses several continents and a couple of centuries, investigating the roots of our fascination with vitamins, and sorting the hope from the hype buried in the claims made for their efficacy. In a story that encompasses Nobel Prize-winning research, corporate secrecy, snake oil salespeople and, astoundingly, cases of scurvy in modern day America, Muller sets out to empower consumers to make reasoned and informed decisions about vitamins — decisions that can save money, but might also save lives.

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