Spies the rise and fall of the kgb in america

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spies the rise and fall of the kgb in america

Spies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America by John Earl Haynes

This stunning book, based on KGB archives that have never come to light before, provides the most complete account of Soviet espionage in America ever written. In 1993, former KGB officer Alexander Vassiliev was permitted unique access to Stalin-era records of Soviet intelligence operations against the United States. Years later, living in Britain, Vassiliev retrieved his extensive notebooks of transcribed documents from Moscow. With these notebooks John Earl Haynes and Harvey Klehr have meticulously constructed a new, sometimes shocking, historical account.

Along with general insights into espionage tactics and the motives of Americans who spied for Stalin, Spies resolves specific, long-seething controversies. The book confirms, among many other things, that Alger Hiss cooperated with Soviet intelligence over a long period of years, that journalist I. F. Stone worked on behalf of the KGB in the 1930s, and that Robert Oppenheimer was never recruited by Soviet intelligence. Spies also uncovers numerous American spies who were never even under suspicion and satisfyingly identifies the last unaccounted for American nuclear spies. Vassiliev tells the story of the notebooks and his own extraordinary life in a gripping introduction to the volume.
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Published 23.01.2019

Operation InfeKtion: How Russia Perfected the Art of War - NYT Opinion

Spies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America

A common perception is that, both before and after the Second World War, the British Establishment was penetrated by Soviet spies most notably by the Cambridge Spy Ring while America somehow escaped infiltration. This important new book, however, which is based on archival material — a rare luxury for intelligence historians — shows the huge extent of Soviet espionage activity in the United States during the 20th century. That book was based on controlled Russian intelligence documents, access to which was negotiated during a moment of Glasnost in the Nineties with a view to supplementing the KGB pension fund, championing Russian intelligence successes and creating a bit of disinformation mischief. It is this information which forms the basis of Spies. Placed alongside the Venona intercepts of Soviet intelligence communications, the evidence from the Mitrokhin archive of Soviet foreign intelligence — brought to the West and published in and — and the testimony of defectors, it has now been possible to fill in much of the Soviet espionage puzzle putting real names to cover names and identifying new spies. Spies is a serious book, whose effectiveness is built up with detail, and it makes for sober reading both in terms of style and content. It proves beyond doubt that Alger Hiss and the Rosenbergs were Soviet agents, reveals the full extent of Soviet efforts to steal the secrets of the atom bomb, gives details of technical and industrial espionage and names many new agents, including a spy who may later have given away Israeli nuclear secrets to the KGB.

The old saying that one cannot judge a book by its cover could be tweaked to observe that sometimes one cannot glean the truth by a book's title. Stone as a stellar spy in the s. One has to hand it to authors Harvey Klehr and John Haynes who know a bit about huckstering and sloganeering. Nothing would scare off prospective book buyers so much as a title about agents or agents of influence or sources. Now that has the proper cloak and dagger ring to it.

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Years later, living in Britain, Vassiliev retrieved his extensive notebooks of transcribed documents from Moscow. With these notebooks John Earl Haynes and Harvey Klehr have meticulously constructed a new, sometimes shocking, historical account. Along with general insights into espionage tactics and the motives of Americans who spied for Stalin, Spies resolves specific, long-seething controversies. The book confirms, among many other things, that Alger Hiss cooperated with Soviet intelligence over a long period of years, that journalist I. Stone worked on behalf of the KGB in the s, and that Robert Oppenheimer was never recruited by Soviet intelligence. Spies also uncovers numerous American spies who were never even under suspicion and satisfyingly identifies the last unaccounted for American nuclear spies. Vassiliev tells the story of the notebooks and his own extraordinary life in a gripping introduction to the volume.

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3 thoughts on “Spies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America by John Earl Haynes

  1. Alexander Vassiliev, a former KGB officer, was given unprecedented access to Stalin-era KBG records that allowed him and his co-authors to present an unprecedented history of Soviet spy activity in America.

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