French masculine and feminine rules

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french masculine and feminine rules

The Rules for the Gender of French Nouns: Why Your Arm Is Masculine But Your Leg Is Feminine, and Other Mysteries of the French Language by Saul H. Rosenthal

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French adjectives Rules: Masculine - Feminine

The genders in French

In short, this is the most persistent struggle in French. Having a conversation? You need gender agreements. Brushing up on vocab? But there are so many French words! How ever will we go through all of them and their genders? Luckily there are some ways to jump that hurdle.

Les boutons se trouvent ci-dessous. There are no hard and fast rules about the gender of a noun so you just have to learn the gender as you go along. Some rules can guide you to an extent. If a word ends in —e, it is normally feminine. If a word ends in a consonant, it is usually masculine.

Intermediate French For Dummies

Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials. Are you getting the free resources, updates, and special offers we send out every week in our teacher newsletter?, There are no real rules or logic to help you decide which article to use, statistically there are more masculine than feminine nouns. Basically you will have to learn the gender by heart.

An adjective modifies a noun or a pronoun. All French adjectives agree in number singular or plural and gender masculine or feminine with the nouns they describe. In fact, in French, all words in a sentence must agree with each other: If, for example, the noun or pronoun is singular, its verb and any adjectives describing it must also be singular. If the noun is feminine, the adjective describing it must also be feminine. Unlike English, most French adjectives are placed after the nouns they modify.

5 thoughts on “The Rules for the Gender of French Nouns: Why Your Arm Is Masculine But Your Leg Is Feminine, and Other Mysteries of the French Language by Saul H. Rosenthal

  1. in -e or -ion. Except words ending in -age, -ege, -é, or -isme (these endings often indicate masculine words).

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