Special interest teachers unions and americas public schools

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special interest teachers unions and americas public schools

Special Interest: Teachers Unions and Americas Public Schools by Terry M. Moe

Why are Americas public schools falling so short of the mark in educating the nations children? Why are they organized in ineffective ways that fly in the face of common sense, to the point that it is virtually impossible to get even the worst teachers out of the classroom? And why, after more than a quarter century of costly education reform, have the schools proven so resistant to change and so difficult to improve?

In this path-breaking book, Terry M. Moe demonstrates that the answers to these questions have a great deal to do with teachers unions—which are by far the most powerful forces in American education and use their power to promote their own special interests at the expense of what is best for kids.

Despite their importance, the teachers unions have barely been studied. Special Interest fills that gap with an extraordinary analysis that is at once brilliant and kaleidoscopic—shedding new light on their historical rise to power, the organizational foundations of that power, the ways it is exercised in collective bargaining and politics, and its vast consequences for American education. The bottom line is simple but devastating: as long as the teachers unions remain powerful, the nations schools will never be organized to provide kids with the most effective education possible.

Moe sees light at the end of the tunnel, however, due to two major transformations. One is political, the other technological, and the combination is destined to weaken the unions considerably in the coming years—loosening their special-interest grip and opening up a new era in which Americas schools can finally be organized in the best interests of children.
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Teacher’s union president compares school choice to segregation

Special Interest: Teachers Unions and America's Public Schools

Use the link below to share a full-text version of this article with your friends and colleagues. Learn more. Volume , Issue 4. The full text of this article hosted at iucr. If you do not receive an email within 10 minutes, your email address may not be registered, and you may need to create a new Wiley Online Library account.

Because, as I suggested in my last post , their dominance in school governance these last several decades has not seemed to work—for the students, the taxpayer, or the country. But even if our schools were working, we would need to be wary of union power because it violates some basic democratic principles; towit, free association and free speech. One of my objectives as a member of a school board—a not-so-hidden agenda, if you will—was to help create an environment where it was safe to discuss how to improve our schools, how to get our kids a better education. This was premised on a belief that debate and discussion are good and lead to better outcomes. At minimum, I assumed that, from a policy and governance perspective, two heads were better than one and that an engaged community would be more apt to deliver a good education than an unengaged and uninformed one. Generally, America has shown the world that open dialogue and debate produces better results. But if you sever the connection between the dialogue and the result the vote , you have sabotaged the system.

Include Synonyms Include Dead terms. Direct link. Why are America's public schools falling so short of the mark in educating the nation's children? Why are they organized in ineffective ways that fly in the face of common sense, to the point that it is virtually impossible to get even the worst teachers out of the classroom? And why, after more than a quarter century of costly education reform, have the schools proven so resistant to change and so difficult to improve?

Special Interest: Teachers Unions and America's Public Schools Paperback – December 1, Why are America's public schools falling so short of the mark in educating the nation's children? Terry M. Moe is the William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science at Stanford.
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Advocacy Groups and Teachers' Unions

Why are America's public schools falling so short of the mark in educating the nation'schildren? Why are they organized in ineffective ways that fly in the face of common sense, to the point that it is virtually impossible to get even the worst teachers out of the classroom? And why, after more than a quarter century of costly education reform,have the schools proven so resistant to change and so difficult to improve? In this path-breaking book, Terry M. Moe demonstrates that the answers to these questions have a great deal to do with teachers unions which are by far the most powerful forces in American education and use their power to promote their own specialinterests at the expense of what is best for kids. Despite their importance, the teachers unions have barely been studied. Special Interest fills that gap with an extraordinary analysis that is at once brilliant and kaleidoscopic shedding new light on their historical rise to power, the organizational foundationsof that power, the ways it is exercised in collective bargaining and politics, and its vast consequences for American education.

Academic journal article Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences. The challenges faced by state and federal leaders as a result of large budget deficits have brought increasing attention to collective bargaining as it relates to public employees and increased scrutiny of America's public schools. Terry M. He identifies them as the "most powerful groups in the American politics of education" p. Moe is clear in stating that he believes these unions must be studied in order to shed light on problems in the nation's public schools. His book is the result of several years of research and critical reflection on the role of teachers unions and their role in American politics. The book begins with a brief history of teachers unions, their rise to prominence, and their impact on collective bargaining laws in states across the nation.

Moe is not exaggerating. The NEA is the fourth-largest single donor in American politics since Many of these funds go towards securing favorable collectively-bargained agreements. Under the guidance of former schools chancellor Michelle Rhee, the school system in Washington, D. These bonuses have the double effect of motivating stronger performance and keeping younger, better teachers in the school system.

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