William shakespeare sonnet about death

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william shakespeare sonnet about death

Sonnets Quotes by William Shakespeare

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Sonnet 66 by William Shakespeare - Read by Sir John Gielgud

Sonnet No longer mourn for me when I am dead. By William Shakespeare. No longer mourn for me when I am dead. Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell.

10 Greatest Shakespeare Sonnets: An Immortal Series

In Sonnet 71, the Bard enjoins his beloved, the Fair Youth, not to grieve for him when he dies. But how sincere is such a wish? This sonnet is actually more layered and complex than it might first appear, so some closer analysis is necessary. No longer mourn for me when I am dead Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell Give warning to the world that I am fled From this vile world with vilest worms to dwell: Nay, if you read this line, remember not The hand that writ it, for I love you so, That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot, If thinking on me then should make you woe. Otherwise, the world would see you mourning and weeping for me, and ridicule you, as they ridicule me for being in love for you and writing these verses.

Shakespeare's famous sonnet A mood of deep sadness in this Sonnet pondering death and the vile world.
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William Shakespeare - Sonnet 66 - Tired Of With All These For Restful Death I Cry - Poetry Reading

No longer mourn for me when I am dead Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell Give warning to the world that I am fled From this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell: Nay, if you read this line, remember not The hand that writ it; for I love you so, That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot, If thinking on me then should make you woe. O, if, I say, you look upon this verse When I perhaps compounded am with clay, Do not so much as my poor name rehearse, But let your love even with my life decay; Lest the wise world should look into your moan, And mock you with me after I am gone. Sonnet 71 is one of sonnets written by the English playwright and poet William Shakespeare. It's a member of the Fair Youth sequence, in which the poet expresses his love towards a young man. It focuses on the speaker's aging and impending death in relation to his young lover. Shakespeare's sonnet cycle has overarching themes of great love and the passage of time. In this sonnet, the speaker is now concentrating on his own death and how the youth is to mourn him after he is deceased.

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