Famous poems about the great depression

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famous poems about the great depression

One Hundred and One Famous Poems: With a Prose Supplement by Roy Jay Cook


The night has a thousand eyes,
And the day but one;
Yet the light of the bright world dies
With the dying sun.

The mind has a thousand eyes,
And the heart but one;
Yet the light of a whole life dies
When love is done.
~Francis William Bourdillon


This old poetry is not necessarily my cup of tea (throw some Bukowski in there with a cup of whiskey and were talking) but I still rate this a solid 5. This is poetry in which you will find some of the most famous lines in history. This is poetry, but in a sense, it is a piece of history as well. The book is capped off with some famous historical documents.
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Published 25.12.2018

5 Poems by Robert Frost

During the darkest days of the Great Depression, artist Alice Neel painted a surreal portrait of her friend, the poet Kenneth Fearing. In it, the gaunt year-old stares out through owl-rimmed glasses, eye sockets hollow from exhaustion and hunger, a gaping hole in his chest.
Roy Jay Cook

And Wow He Died As Wow He Lived

The stock market crash of October ended a decade of rapid economic growth in America. By , roughly a quarter of workers were unemployed, nearly half the nation's banks had failed, and stocks had lost 80 percent of their value, according to an analysis by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Through the works of poets like Donald Justice and Randolph Goodman, it's possible to gain insights into how America's worst economic collapse affected the average person. Co-written by lyricist Yip Harburg and composer Jay Gorney, this song emerged as a populist anthem on its release. What's not commonly known is that Harburg began as a writer of light verse, his son and biographer, Ernie Harburg, wrote in a November article for the Democracy Now website. The song existed only in lyric form until Gorney allowed Harburg to use one of his melodies. Harburg's theme is the Depression's emotional toll, which he frames throughout the song as a pointed question: "Once I built a railroad, now it's done.

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Denis Martindale

The use of the line here is an attempt to convey a sense of the position of poetry in a certain time, specifically, the America of the s, the America of the Great Depression. The period was a time of now-unimaginable cultural instability. The depredations of the Great Depression, coincident with the rise to power of totalitarian regimes in Europe, led many to fear imminent and violent political revolution McElvaine Many others endured the deep hopelessness of economic failure. In the midst of this experience poetic expression maintained a widespread presence in the cultural landscape. The title suggests this presence, but it also suggests the use of the poetry of the time.

4 thoughts on “One Hundred and One Famous Poems: With a Prose Supplement by Roy Jay Cook

  1. The stock market crash of October ended a decade of rapid economic growth in America. Through the works of poets like Donald Justice and Randolph Goodman, it's possible to gain insights into how America's worst economic collapse affected the average person.

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