Evidence based practice in clinical social work

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evidence based practice in clinical social work

Clinical Social Work Practice in Behavioral Mental Health: Toward Evidence-Based Practice by Roberta G. Sands

Clinical Social Work Practice in Behavioral Mental Health, 3/e uses evidence-based practice to provide in-depth coverage of clinical social work practice with clients in mental health settings. The authors show the social worker as the critical link between the client, the agency, the family, and the community. Organized around 2 parts: PART I: A Framework for Practice (History, Culturally Competency, Legal and Ethical Issues, Biopsychosocial framework and assessment and Feminist Practice) and PART II: Intervention (Evidence Based Practice with clients with: Depression, Anxiety Disorders, Serious Mental Illness, Severe Mental Illness in Community Context and with their Families, and Co-occuring Substance Abuse and Serious Mental Illness)
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What is Evidence Based Practice ?

Evidence-Based Practice for Social Work

Social workers increasingly are seeking information about evidence-based practices. Numerous resources are emerging to help connect research to practice and provide information that can be helpful to practitioners. Since the term evidence-based practice EBP is used in numerous ways, definitions will be provided that can help expand social workers understanding of EBP. Since the identification of evidence-based practices involves assessing the available body of practice-relevant research, having a robust social work research base is important. In April , the National Institute of Mental Health NIMH hosted an invitational symposium of social work leaders, representatives from federal agencies and national organizations, consumer and advocacy groups, and experts who were implementing model EBP efforts in states and at schools of social work. Portions of this Web page are adapted from a report and the briefing paper developed by IASWR in conjunction with a symposium.

It seems that you're in Germany. We have a dedicated site for Germany. Authors: Drisko , James W. The second edition of Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Social Work continues to bridge the gap between social work research and clinical practice, presenting EBP as both an effective approach to social work and a broader social movement. Building on the models and insights outlined in the first edition, this new edition provides updated research and additional case studies addressing relevant issues such as trauma treatment and opioid dependence. Drawing on their multidisciplinary experience as practitioners, researchers, and educators, the authors guide readers through the steps of the EBP decision-making process in assessment, treatment planning, and evaluation.

It seems that you're in Germany. We have a dedicated site for Germany. Authors: Drisko , James W. Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Social Work introduces the key ideas of evidence-based clinical social work practice and their thoughtful application. It intends to inform practitioners and to address the challenges and needs faced in real world practice. This book lays out the many strengths of the EBP model, but also offers perspectives on its limitations and challenges.

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Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Social Work

If we truly understood evidence-based practice as a process, this chaos would not be negatively impacting our practices, policies and agency decisions. In fairness to practitioners and policymakers, many academics who have driven discussions of evidence-based practice have done a poor job of using a common definition. When we have individual models that we designate as evidence-based, we create chaos because we assume that the same intervention or program will work for everyone regardless of their culture, values and preferences. The consequences of this chaos can include wasted time and money, potentially lower levels of client engagement, partially implemented programs and clients who do not receive the very best services. First, we need to understand who decides something is evidence-based.

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